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What You Don’t Know Can Cause a Heart Attack

By on April 2, 2014

   What is one of the greatest tragedies in medicine?  It’s to die of a disease that could be easily prevented. Every 37 seconds in North America someone dies of a heart attack. Now, there’s proof that coronary deaths could be avoided by high doses of vitamin C and lysine. 
  During an interview 25 years ago Dr. Linus Pauling, two-time Nobel Prize winner, told me something I had not learned at The Harvard Medical School. It was that animals produce their own vitamin C but humans lost this genetic ability eons ago. Pauling claimed this was bad luck for humans as vitamin C is needed to make collagen. Bricks are held together by mortar, coronary cells are glued together by collagen. Pauling believed that a lack of vitamin C triggered cracks in collagen setting the stage for a fatal blood clot. 
  Pauling’s critics ridiculed him, claiming humans no longer die from scurvy, the result of insufficient amounts of C. Years ago sailors on long voyages used to die of this disease due to a lack of fruit. But to avoid scurvy you only need 10 milligrams of vitamin C whereas several thousand are required to manufacture healthy collagen. As Pauling reminded his opponents, “It’s the dosage, stupid”.                                    
   Three years ago I read in an obscure medical journal that Dr. Sydney Bush, an English researcher, had discovered proof that Pauling was right. Bush, an optometrist, noted that patients with contact lenses were more prone to eye infections. He decided to prescribe 6,000 milligrams of vitamin C along with 4,000 mg of lysine, an amino acid, to see if this combination had any effect.            
  Fortunately, he took photos of the retina (the back part of the eye) before this treatment and one year later. He was surprised to find that previously blocked retinal arteries were gradually returning to normal.
   This was such monumental news that I couldn’t believe it. So I travelled to England and spent several days looking at “before and after” photos of the retina. Bush was right; he had reversed blocked retinal arteries. And since the head is connected to the body, vitamin C and lysine can prevent blockage of coronary arteries and, if present, remove it.
  Sixteen years ago I suffered a coronary attack followed by bypass surgery. Cardiologists told me it was madness not to take cholesterol-lowering drugs. But I did not believe in their effectiveness and was well aware of their side-effects. So I bet my life on vitamin C and lysine. Now at 90 years of age I’ve proved them wrong. But for years I’ve been swallowing tons of pills every day and not enjoying it.
  Fortunately, powders containing high concentrations of vitamin C and lysine are now available in health food stores. For those without a history of heart problems 2,000 mg of C and 1,300 mg of lysine twice a day is sufficient. But if there’s been a heart attack or a family history of cardiac disease it’s prudent to take 6,000mg of C and 4,000 mg of lysine. But it is always prudent to check with your own doctor when either changing or starting a new supplement. 
  Cardiologists believe that cholesterol-lowering drugs are still the be-all-and-end-all solution to heart attack prevention. They’ve been brain washed by the hundred of millions of dollars spent by pharmaceutical companies to market these drugs. But criticizing, cholesterol-lowering drugs are akin to damning Motherhood and apple pie. 
  History shows that closed minds to new ideas have caused countless deaths over the ages. Dr. Semmelweiss proved in 1847 that washing hands before an obstetrical delivery saved many women from dying of infection. Colleagues ridiculed him and one in six women continued to leave the hospital in a coffin rather than with their newborn baby.
  Unfortunately, hell will freeze over before cardiologists change their ingrained ideas and prescribe high doses of vitamin C and lysine. It means that countless people will continue to die needlessly of heart attack and continue to take cholesterol-lowering drugs associated with hazardous side-effects.
  This tragedy could end if doctors would only look at Dr. Bush’s retinal photos that show dramatic reversal of atherosclerosis after treatment with high doses of vitamin C and lysine. 

    W.Gifford-Jones, MD is a graduate of The University of Toronto and The Harvard Medical School. He took post-graduate training in surgery at the Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester, McGill University in Montreal and Harvard. During his medical training he has been a family doctor, hotel doctor and ship’s surgeon. He is a Fellow of The Royal College of Surgeons and author of seven books.

 For research and more information about Medi C Plus™ visit: Medi-C.ca

About Charleen Wyman

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