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Make Your Own Autumn Soaps

By on October 5, 2014

In addition to offering its warm, spicy scent, cinnamon is an antiseptic, a stimulant and an aphrodisiac.

Cinnamon Soap

Ingredients
7.5 oz mineral water 213g
3 oz lye (caustic soda) 85 g
1.5 lbs extra virgin olive oil 682 g
0.35 oz pure cocoa butter 10 g
1 tbsp ground cinnamon 15 mL
0.07 oz cinnamon leaf essential oil 2 g

Directions
Wearing gloves and goggles, pour mineral water into a large saucepan. Add the lye slowly, stirring gently until it is dissolved.

Using a thermometer, monitor the temperature of the lye mixture until it is between 120˚F and 140˚F (49˚C and 60˚C).

Meanwhile, in a separate saucepan, heat olive oil to between 120˚F and 140˚F (49˚C and 60˚C). Remove olive oil from heat. Add lye mixture to olive oil, stirring slowly and trying not to splash.

Stir occasionally, every 15 minutes or so, until the mixture thickens and congeals. (It will have a texture similar to that of light mayonnaise.) Stir in cocoa butter, ground cinnamon and essential oil.

Stir for 1 minute with a spoon (or with a whisk, take care not to create foam).

Pour into a greased or paper-lined soap mold. Gently tap mold to remove any air bubbles.

Cover with a blanket or towel and let stand for 2 days. Uncover and let stand for an additional day if the mold is very large. Turn soap out of the mold. Wait another day, then cut into bars as desired.

Dry bars for 1 month, turning occasionally to ensure they are drying uniformly.

Screen shot 2014-10-05 at 10.33.16 PM

Rosemary Soap

Ingredients
7.5 oz rosemary infusion 213g
3 oz lye (caustic soda) 85 g
1.5 lbs extra virgin olive oil 682 g
1 tbsp rosemary leaves or flowers 15mL
0.15 oz rosemary essential oil 4 g

Directions
To make the rosemary infusion, in a bowl, pour 7.5 oz (213g) boiling water over 1 tbsp (15mL) crushed rosemary. Cover and let stand for 5 minutes. Strain and weigh for recipe. Note: Exact measurements are crucial in soap making.

Wearing gloves and goggles, pour rosemary infusion into a large saucepan. Add lye slowly, stirring gently until it is dissolved.

Using a thermometer, monitor the temperature of the lye mixture until it is between 120˚F and 140˚F (49˚C and 60˚C).

Meanwhile, in a separate saucepan, heat olive oil to between 120˚F and 140˚F (49˚C and 60˚C).
Remove olive oil from heat. Add lye mixture to olive oil, stirring slowly and trying not to splash.
Stir occasionally, every 15 minutes or so, until the mixture thickens and congeals. (It will have a texture similar to that of light mayonnaise.)

Stir in rosemary leaves and essential oil. Stir for one minute with a spoon (or with a whisk, taking care not to create any foam).

Pour into a greased or paper-lined soap mold. Gently tap mold to remove any air bubbles.

Cover with a blanket or towel and let stand for 2 days. Uncover and let stand for an additional day if the mold is very large.

Turn soap out of the mold. Wait another day, then cut into bars as desired.

Dry bars for 1 month, turning occasionally to ensure they are drying uniformly. This heavenly smelling soap is an excellent skin disinfectant. Rosemary is such a powerful herb that it should not be used during the first trimester of pregnancy and is contraindicated in people with epilepsy.

Courtesy of “The Best Homemade Natural Soaps” by Mar Gómez, 2014 © www.robertrose.ca Reprinted with publisher permission.

 

 

About Charleen Wyman

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